Early Respiratory Infections and Risk for Type 1 Diabetes: The TEDDY Study

October 5, 2017

Timing appears to be nearly everything when it comes to the impact of respiratory infection on autoantibody seroconversion in infants at risk for tpye 1 diabetes.

Do respiratory infections in the first 3 months of life play a role in the development of type 1 diabetes? Results from several studies are in conflict:USA: Study in more than 1700 children showed no link between respiratory illness and islet autoimmunity1Europe: Two studies suggest a link between respiratory infections and increased risk of islet autoimmunity2,3The short slide show above summarizes the design and results of the largest propsective international cohort study to examine environmental determinants of type 1 diabetes.  

References:

1. Snell-Bergeon JK, Smith J, Dong F, et al. Early childhood infections and the risk of islet autoimmunity: the Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young (DAISY). Diabetes Care. 2012;35:2553-8. doi: 10.2337/dc12-0423. Epub 2012 Oct 5.
2. Rasmussen T, Witsø E, Tapia G, Stene LC, et al. Self-reported lower respiratory tract infections and development of islet autoimmunity in children with the type 1 diabetes high-risk HLA genotype: the MIDIA study. Diabetes Metab Res Rev. 2011;27:834-7. doi: 10.1002/dmrr.1258.
3. Beyerlein A, Wehweck F, Ziegler AG, et al. Respiratory infections in early life and the development of islet autoimmunity in children at increased type 1 diabetes risk: evidence from the BABYDIET study. JAMA Pediatr. 2013;167:800-7. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.158.
4. Lönnrot M, Lynch KF, Elding Larsson H, et al. Respiratory infections are temporally associated with initiation of type 1 diabetes autoimmunity: the TEDDY study. Diabetologia. 2017 Aug 2. doi: 10.1007/s00125-017-4365-5

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