HCP Live
Contagion LiveCGT LiveNeurology LiveHCP LiveOncology LiveContemporary PediatricsContemporary OBGYNEndocrinology NetworkPractical CardiologyRheumatology Netowrk

Study Details Reaction to POGO Automatic Blood Glucose Monitors Among Diabetes Care and Education Specialists

A study presented at ADCES 22 details opinions of certified diabetes care and education specialists toward the POGO Automatic blood glucose monitoring system.

New research presented at the Association of Diabetes Care and Education Specialists (ADCES) 2022 annual meeting highlights the reaction of certified diabetes care and education specialists to the POGO automatic blood glucose monitoring system.

With the uptake of the technology, which was billed as the first automatic blood glucose meter when approved by the FDA in 2016, increasing, results of the current study demonstrate a favorable response among diabetes care and education specialists with the POGO automatic blood glucose monitoring system.

“The relationship between the inherent complexity of the tools used to manage diabetes and their successful use in both the population of people with diabetes and the providers who deliver care to them is of increasing scientific interest. The POGO Automatic blood glucose monitoring system was designed to simplify testing anywhere by integrating test strips, lancets, and lancing devices into one disposable cartridge,” wrote investigators.

With an interest in learning more about the reactions and opinions of certified diabetes care and education specialist toward POGO automatic blood glucose monitoring system, Dave Yamauchi and Michael Tomasco designed the current study to aggregate data related to these reactions for the purpose of analysis. To do so, the present study was designed by dQ&A Research on behalf of Intuity Medical Inc, to collect feedback based on a series of 4 questions:

  • Is POGO automatic easy to teach, learn, and use?
  • Could POGO Automatic and Patterns improve the frequency of blood glucose checking and reduce instances of forgetting to check?
  • What are the reasons a patient who takes multiple daily doses of insulin might not check as frequently as recommended?
  • What are the top reasons for recommending a different blood glucose monitor?

The survey was sent to 300 individuals betweenJuly 27-August 4, 2021. Of these 300k, 289 completed survey responses. Investigators pointed out an honorarium was offered for completing the survey. Based on the aforementioned questions, participants were asked to rate their level of agreement to questions, with 1 indicating they strongly disagree and 5 indicating they agree strongly.

Initial analysis of survey results indicated 97% of respondents found POGO automatic blood glucose monitoring system was easy to use. Additionally, 94% agreed it was easy to learn, 93% felt it was easy to teach and 88% agreed use of the technology is easier to use than their patients’ current blood glucose monitor. Among the 242 respondents who provided information on what features make the system more convenient, 96% remarked it removed the need to handle separate lancets and test strips. Other notable responses included 86% of respondents noting use was much easier because use eliminates most of the steps required to check blood glucose with a traditional blood glucose monitor and 79% noted use was much easier because it resulted in fewer supplies to carry around.

Further analysis found respondents indicated the removal of need to handle separate lancets and test strips as well as the elimination of most of the steps required to check blood glucose with a traditional blood glucose monitor were identified as the factors most likely to encourage more frequent blood glucose check. Additionally, investigators found the leading reasons patients with MDI did not check the blood glucose as often as recommended was because they forgot to check (86%) or they were too busy (79%).

“POGO Automatic and Patterns could improve the frequency of patient blood glucose checking and reduce instances of forgetting to check,” wrote investigators

This study, “Certified Diabetes Care and Education Specialist (CDCES) Reactions to the POGO Automatic Blood Glucose Monitoring System,” was published at ADCES 2022.