More than 1-in-3 Diabetics Meet ADA Criteria for SGLT2 Inhibitors

November 18, 2020
Patrick Campbell

George Bakris, MD, discusses a study he took part in from AHA 2020 examining the number of diabetic patients meeting the American Diabetes Association's criteria for prescribing an SGLT2 inhibitor.

This article was originally published on PracticalCardiology.com.

Despite multiple clinical trials demonstrating benefit, optimal prescription of SGLT2 inhibitors remains an issue across the US.

Highlighting the potential for increased use in US populations, new data from a study at the American Heart Association (AHA)’s Scientific Sessions 2020 suggests 35% of diabetic individuals had a first-line indication for an SGLT2 inhibitor according to American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommendations.

With an interest in quantifying the proportion of diabetic patients considered guideline eligible for SGLT2 inhibitor prescription, a team of investigators sought to determine the prevalence using data from the 2007-2016 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey with survey weight designed to estimate the US population. In total, investigators estimated the prevalence of diabetes among patients 18 years of age or older in the US population to be 21,411,059.

Investigators determined 7,504,508 adults from this cohort had CKD and diabetes, which would make them eligible for an SGLT2 inhibitor prescription. Investigators pointed out the mean age of guidelines eligible individuals was 64.4 years, 51.8% were men, and 48.2% were women.

For more on the results of this study and what can be done to improve prescribing practices of SGLT2 inhibitors, Practical Cardiology sat down with George Bakris, MD, professor of medicine at the University of Chicago Medicine and member of Endocrinology Network’s editorial advisory board.