FDA Warns 10 Companies For Illegally Marketing Supplements Claiming to Treat Diabetes

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) have warned a total of 10 companies for illegally selling dietary supplements claiming to treat or prevent diabetes.

Announced in a statement from the FDA on September 9, the organizations posted warning letters to the 10 companies for violating the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act by illegally selling dietary supplements that claim to cure, treat, mitigate, or prevent diabetes.

"More than 34 million Americans— just over 1 in 10 people— are living with diabetes. Dietary supplements that make fraudulent claims to treat diabetes are unapproved new drugs that could potentially harm consumers who use these products instead of seeking safe and effective FDA-approved treatments,” said Cara Welch, PhD, Acting Director of the Office of Dietary Supplement Programs in the FDA’s Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition. “The FDA is committed to protecting U.S. consumers from products and companies that make unlawful claims to treat or prevent diabetes, and we’ll continue to hold companies accountable by alerting the public about products that place consumers at risk.”

As part of the process, the FDA has requested responses from the companies within 15 working days explaining how they will address issues or provide reasoning and supporting information for why they believed the products are not in violation of the law. Companies that received warning letters included:

This is a breaking news story and will be updated when, and if, more information becomes available.